Banned Books Week: September 26 to October 3

24September

Banned Books Week: September 26 to October 3

What do The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, The World According to Garp, and Of Mice and Men have in common?

They’ve all been banned.

At one point or another, somebody (or a group of somebodies, as is often the case), decided that these books – and hundreds of others – should be removed from libraries and schools. And who decided that these somebodies had the final say over what lines our community bookshelves?

Well, um . . . they did.

Banned Books Week Banner
Photo by DML East Branch

I can’t imagine going through high school without Kurt Vonnegut or John Irving. Or being a ‘tween without Judy Blume. Or a college student without Flannery O’Connor or Toni Morrison. Or never reading The Kite Runner or Babbitt because somebody didn’t think it was right for me.

Bill Maher calls it “legistlating taste.” Thomas Jefferson was “mortified” at the thought. Chuck Palahniuk called censored media “white noise.”

Banned Books Week is sponsored by the American Booksellers Association, American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, and the American Library Association, just to name a few. And it has one purpose: to celebrate our First Amendment and our freedom to read (and write) what we want.

Wanna join the celebration? Check out this list of banned books from the American Library Association, and pick up a banned book.

Happy Banned Books Week!!

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Posted by Stephanie  Posted on 24 Sep 
  • banned books, Banned Books Week, books, censorship, fiction, First Amendment, freedom of speech, Libraries, novels, reading, writing
  • Post Comments 4

    Posted by Michelle on
    • Sep 24 2009
    Reply  
    My favorite on this list (actually, one of my all-time favorites): Vladmir Nabokov's Lolita.
    Posted by Andrew Zar on
    • Sep 24 2009
    Reply  
    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand The Fountainhead by Ayn Ran That is a stunning example of the power of words - there is literally nothing offensive in those books (at least nothing I can remember), but they promote the idea of objectivism - and just that idea was too powerful to have people read about? WOW. Atlas Shrugged is still my all-time favorite book - after reading it, I quit my job and started a consulting business and have never regretted it.
    Posted by Wintress on
    • Sep 25 2009
    Reply  
    Never read Atlas Shrugged, but I did really like Fountainhead -- worshiped the book for a while, actually. At least that one I can see where people would get a little up in arms, but Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy banned. Really? LOL.
    Posted by Wintress on
    • Sep 25 2009
    Reply  
    You know...cause "The Answer to the Universe is 42" Now THAT'S a dangerous idea.

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