Beyond Blogging: Making Your Copy Stand Out

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19 Jan 2009

BEYOND BLOGGING: MAKING YOUR COPY STAND OUT

So, we all know that a blog is essential to any well-rounded marketing strategy: A good blog helps you connect with your customers and lets them see you as more than just a faceless company or organization. It builds content and credibility for your web site, and it allows you to share industry news and connect with others in your industry.

Problem is, everyone has a blog nowadays, from marketing gurus to Fortune 500 CEOs. Some are fantastic – interesting, with no-fluff content and good information. Some are mediocre at best. But, regardless of quality, they’re everywhere. Do a search for “copywriting blog” for instance, and you’ll get thousands of results. Ditto for “marketing blog,” “advertising blog” – you name it. A blog in itself is no longer a big differentiator.

Now, don’t get me wrong: I’m not saying that you should give up on blogging. But, if you really want to stand out, try some of these strategies:

Get on Social Media. Social media sites let you connect easily with potential customers and business partners. Create a profile for your business and start reaching out to people in your industry – be sure to include a link to your company web site and share your blog posts. It’s a great way to build connections in a casual setting. Even better: Start a group or forum and invite people to join you for a discussion about the latest industry news.
Be Interactive. Why simply dump information on your readers when you can invite them to join the conversation? If you’ve got a blog, invite comments and make sure you respond to the readers who take the time to leave them. Have contests and invite your readers to get their creative juices flowing, whether it’s coming up with a name for a product or writing a catchy tagline. The more fun and interactive your blog is, the more likely it is to develop a following of regular readers.
Leave Comments. If you’re like me, you probably have a handful of blogs that you read regularly. Next time you read something you really like, why not leave a comment? A good blog isn’t a one-way street. But remember: No sales talk. Keep comments insightful and don’t use them simply as a chance to toot your own horn.
Write a Whitepaper. A whitepaper is a great way to connect with potential business partners and establish yourself as an industry expert. They’re meatier than a simple blog entry and require a lot more work, but the payoff for an interesting, well-written whitepaper is worth all the effort.
Blog often. Sure, you’re busy. Projects, meetings, phone conferences, and the day-to-day business of running a business can leave you strapped for time. It’s easy to let your blog fall by the wayside in favor of more urgent deadlines. But, your blog doesn’t do you any good if you’re only posting once every six months. Set aside some blogging time at least once a week to keep your content fresh and give readers a reason to come back.

Got any tips for making your blog stand out? I’d love to hear them.

Author
The Writers For Hire, Inc. 
At The Writers For Hire, you are hiring not just one copywriter, but a streamlined team of experienced writing professionals. We've perfected our unique cooperative writing model, so you'll have the advantage of receiving a fine-tuned final draft that has been reviewed by several editors.

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  • 2 Comments

Mark Andrews

June 16, 2010

Has anyone any demonstrable evidence on their ROI by means of social media. I'm developing a site about anger management for children and have been approached by a person that would really like me to outsource social networking as part of my launch. Just wondered if it was going to be worthwhile in terms of a return.

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    Wintress

    June 16, 2010

    As far as I know: No. It's a question that is asked often, but I have not seen any definitive studies that attribute a specific ROI to social media marketing. First, you have all of the problems you traditionally encounter when trying to measure ROI for PR. The issue is compounded by the fact that social media marketing campaigns are typically a mish-mash of several different tactics, all rolled up under an SMM title. So, for example, you may run a direct-response (easily measureable) campaign that offers a coupon if your clients fan you on facebook. On the other hand, you may also be running a branding campaign, such as article distribution on twitter, blogs, facebook, digg, etc. The returns on such a campaign are not easily tracked. If someone reads five of your articles on the Internet, gains a sense of trust for your brand, and then responds to a direct-response TV commercial. Should the ROI by attributed to the SMM campaign or the TV commercial? One thing you may want to check out: http://www.unilyzer.com/. Honestly, I don't know a thing about it, but I ran accross it the other day, and it looked like it may be useful for tracking SMM marketing campaigns. Let us know if you try it -- I'd like to know what you think of it.

    Reply

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